Kids Container Almond Trees

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Kids in Turkey have been eating almonds since prehistoric times. Almonds resemble the pit of a peach, to which the nuts are related. In the Middle Ages, Arabs were making almond milk from blanched, soaked and pounded almonds. Almond milk can be used in place of milk in recipes as almonds are rich in protein, calcium, magnesium, Vitamin E, monounsaturated fat, and fiber. Almonds need a warm climate as they flower in February and do well in California which grows all U.S. almonds and 70% of the world’s almonds. Many almond varieties need at least two varieties of almond trees to be cross-pollinated. Busy bees must introduce the pollen of one almond variety to the blossoms of the other. Kids can grow a self-pollinated almond tree on a dwarf peach rootstock in a large container. In cold climates, they can be moved indoors to protect their blossoms. Like fruit trees, container almond trees need their roots trimmed every couple of years. Pull the almond tree out of its container in early winter and trim 1 inch of the roots off all sides of the root ball. Add a layer of fresh potting soil to the bottom and sides of the pot and put the root trimmed tree back in the container with fresh potting soil and mulch on top. Kids can plant herbs, like sage, garlic, borage, and comfrey and berry bushes near by to attract garden partners. Almonds are used in cookies, cakes, and pastries, chopped, ground, and made into flour, milk, and butter. Middle Eastern kids love almonds, rice, and dates for breakfast.

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